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Basement Fallout Shelter

Basement Fallout Shelter

Fallout Shelter Plans. It is hard to find good fallout shelter plans. There are links to sites that discuss fallout shelter plans in the left column. The basic difference between a tornado shelter and a fallout shelter is the 30 inches of dirt over a fallout shelter, and the U shaped air inlet and outlet that makes the air go up before it enters the shelter. Most fallout is heavy dust that will not go up the curved 6 inch air intake pipe, especially if it has a dust filter on it.
basement fallout shelter 1

Basement Fallout Shelter

As someone who has studied this stuff forever I only have a couple of complaints about your design.The biggest one is floor space. In the war scenario, you’re gonna be stuck down there for a minimum of 2 weeks. You’ll need to be able to move around freely just to keep your health and sanity. Not a big deal in a tiny house because you’re free to go outside, but try not leaving a tiny house for two weeks or more.The second is for the best radiation protection, the shelter should be at least 8 feet underground at the roof.My final thought of course is to bear in mind while this would make an excellent fallout shelter, it is by no means a blast shelter. It’ll work great as long as you’re nowhere near a target. The earth arching you have in the design will help, but being constructed of concrete (even reinforced) it’s not the best design to mitigate ground shock. If that concrete cracks (even if it didn’t fail and collapse) you’d have groundwater flooding the shelter. Which would force you out into the fallout.The best blast shelters are made from either fiberglass or corrugated steel, and are designed to flex some under ground shock conditions. Utah Shelter Systems and Radius Engineering would be great examples of blast shelter manufacturers.
basement fallout shelter 2

Basement Fallout Shelter

Storm/Fallout Shelter. You know you need a storm shelter. A tornado can stike anywhere, and sooner or later a tornado will hit your community. You can build a tornado shelter under your house or in your back yard. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) does not have tornado shelter plans for you, but they do have FEMA fallout shelter plans from the 60s that will protect you from tornados.
basement fallout shelter 3

Basement Fallout Shelter

The idea is to figure out exactly where in your yard or home basement to put your planned fallout shelter.  If your home is north of a military base, then you want to use the southern wall of your basement or the yard by the north facing side of your house to put your fallout shelter.  The idea is to get as much mass, such as soil piled against the outside basement wall of your home, as possible between you and the possible detonation and its aftereffects.
basement fallout shelter 4

Basement Fallout Shelter

My grandparents actually built a fallout shelter because it was part of the building code for the area in the 80s. It was just a square room in the cellar with extra-insulated walls, a thick metal door, and an air-filtration system that worked with either electricity or a hand crank (not sure how that worked, but that’s how I remember it).From my experience of standing in the room for 10 minutes and feeling seriously claustrophobic, these would be my suggestions for a shelter: consider that you’d have to live in this shelter for an extended period of time if you have to use it at all. Furnish it accordingly. Include board games, books or magazines and dynamo-operated flashlights in the inventory of the shelter. Check the expiry date of stored food at least once a year and make sure it’ll still be edible if you ever end up having to use it. Consider a way to have a working radio in the shelter (maybe have the antenna go through the air vent?), or how will you know when it’s safe to get out?Btw, Michael, I like how you actually have an extra room for the toilet. My grandparents had a chemical toilet standing in the corner of their shelter, with a shower-curtain around it. I think that would not be the most desirable option. I’m glad we never had to use it.
basement fallout shelter 5

Basement Fallout Shelter

War and other dangerous situations like tornadoes, hurricanes, and violent storms have always terrified people and caused them to desire safe shelter. This is why even today people question how to build a fallout shelter, so they will always have a safe place to stay in the event of a serious situation. While it’s true that building a fallout shelter may be all for naught, as it may never really be used for any kind of emergency, the peace of mind it gives the owner(s) of the shelter makes the actual investment a wise one.
basement fallout shelter 6

Basement Fallout Shelter

Why not make your tornado shelter a fallout shelter too? The question is not IF, but WHEN terrorists will set off a nuclear device in the USA or in the Middle East. The fallout from a nuclear explosion or accident in the USA will reach you in minutes, hours or days, depending on your distance from the incident. The fallout from nuclear weapons in the Middle East will reach the USA in seven days.
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Basement Fallout Shelter

You need to build and stock your own Fallout Shelter to survive the fallout from nuclear explosions or accidents in the USA or the Middle East. If you never need it to save your life from nuclear fallout you can be thankful. In the mean time, the shelter may save your life from a Tornado, the supplies may carry you through hard times, and you will have peace of mind.
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You have a lot of different options when you are trying to decide what type of shelter to build for a nuclear event. The first and most important question is whether you need to build a fallout or blast shelter. Blast shelters are designed to withstand the initial explosion, and these are the kind of shelters that you will need to build if you live in close proximity to a high risk target. Think crowded cities, banking meccas, D.C., or any city or building that has been identified as a prime target in your area. If you don’t live near one of those areas, you will simply need to build a fallout shelter.
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My final thought of course is to bear in mind while this would make an excellent fallout shelter, it is by no means a blast shelter. It’ll work great as long as you’re nowhere near a target. The earth arching you have in the design will help, but being constructed of concrete (even reinforced) it’s not the best design to mitigate ground shock. If that concrete cracks (even if it didn’t fail and collapse) you’d have groundwater flooding the shelter. Which would force you out into the fallout.
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Hi PrepperDoc, Mass and distance: exactly! As I mentioned in the Above Ground Shelter comments, several years ago new studies came out showing that just getting yourself into a car before the fallout lands on you and staying there would cut fatalities by over half. An interior room or basement is a huge improvement over that. Just because a proper fallout shelter would be ideal, lack of one is no reason to despair.
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The demand for well-stocked fallout shelters has receded since the end of the Cold War. Today, another nuclear risk looms—a terrorist cell detonating a single nuclear weapon in a major city—and it requires different preparedness. In 2010, the U.S. government released a 130-page publication designed to help local officials plan for the explosion of a 10-kiloton weapon. The publication instructs survivors (anyone outside the blast radius) to shelter where they are, preferably in a basement or other underground space. It recommends waiting at least 12 hours before emerging; fallout drops by 90 percent within 7 hours of detonation. Not all experts agree with the shelter-in-place campaign. Joseph Cirincione, the author of Bomb Scare: The History and Future of Nuclear Weapons, says firestorms could turn such shelters into coffins. “The only true defense against a nuclear attack is to prevent it from happening in the first place,” he says.
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I’m not an expert fallout shelter designer, but the basics are easy to understand. So now that we’ve all been reminded that radiation from nuclear fallout is all bad, lets move onto fallout shelters.
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Whatever construction you end up working with, you will need to prepare the inside of the shelter as well as the physical structure itself. There is a tremendous amount of planning that goes into fallout shelter readiness. You will need, at minimum, enough water and food to survive a period of two weeks in the shelter, and the more food and water you have the better. After all, it is possible that you may have to remain in the shelter for far more than a two week period.

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